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Diesel vs. Gas Trucks Pros & Cons

Decision Time - Should You Choose A Diesel Truck Over A Gas Powered One?

Thinking of buying a truck? Start by choosing the engine type you want! ? Ultimately, your choice will depend completely on your needs. Diesel trucks can generally tow much heavier weights than gasoline vehicles but gas trucks have better acceleration. Diesel trucks also tend to be more expensive than their gas counterparts.

Back To Basics - What is a diesel truck ?

Diesel engines are compression-ignition engines, meaning that the fuel is ignited by compression of the air in the engine. This makes them extremely efficient, and they can run on a variety of fuels, including biodiesel, ethanol, or even straight vegetable oil!

Diesel trucks are more fuel efficient than gasoline powered vehicles because diesel engines create more torque, which allows the truck to move more weight with less power. Although diesel fuel is often more expensive than gasoline, the fuel economy of a diesel truck can offset this cost over time.

What are the pros of buying a diesel truck

  • Diesel engines have a longer lifespan than gasoline engines

  • Diesel engines are less expensive to maintain than gasoline engines

  • Diesel trucks are more fuel efficient than gasoline powered vehicles

What are the cons of buying a diesel truck?

  • They are more expensive to buy than gasoline trucks

  • They are more difficult to start in cold weather

  • Diesel engines are noisier than gasoline engine

What are the pros of buying a gas powered truck?

  • Gasoline-powered trucks have better acceleration than diesel..

  • The engines are typically less expensive than diesel engines.

  • They are easier to start in cold weather.

  • Gasoline engines are generally less expensive to maintain.

  • Trucks with gasoline engines can run on other fuels, such as ethanol, which is becoming more common.

What are the cons of buying a gasoline powered truck?

  • Gas powered trucks are cheaper to buy, but diesel engines have a higher resale value.

  • Diesel engines also offer better fuel economy and typically produce more torque than gasoline engines.

  • Gasoline engines experience engine problems more frequently. This means that you may end up paying more for repairs down the road.

The Bottom Line:

If you're frequently towing large trailers or hauling heavy loads, a diesel engine is likely a better choice. They have much more torque than gasoline engines and can handle more weight. Gasoline engines are better for acceleration and everyday driving, making them a good choice for people who don't need to tow or haul a lot of weight. Diesel trucks tend to be more expensive than gas trucks, so if you're on a budget, a gasoline engine may be the best option for you.

 

How Trim Level & Options Affect Trade In Value

What Is My Car Worth?

When you go to trade your car at a dealership, some of the more obvious things to consider is the condition of the vehicle, trim level and options of your car. The dealer looks at its resale value which is driven by factors such as how popular the model is, how much demand there is for that model and what the going rate is for similar models.

How does the condition of the vehicle affect trade in value?

Mechanical and cosmetic conditions are the two biggest factors that affect a car's value. If your car is in good mechanical condition, it means that it doesn't have any major problems and is safe to drive. A car in good cosmetic condition will have a clean interior and exterior with no major dents, scratches or rust.

Cars that need mechanical work means the dealer will likely have to spend money fixing it before they can sell it, so they'll give you a lower trade-in value. Likewise, if your car has cosmetic damage, the dealer will want to repair it or discount the price to sell it as-is.

How does mileage of the vehicle affect its trade in value?

According to an article on KBB

The United States Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration said that the average person drove 14,263 miles per year in 2019. That’s roughly 1,200 miles per month per driver or about 39 miles per day. By comparison, the DOT said the average annual miles was 13,476 in 2018.

If your car has more than that, it may have a lower trade-in value because it has been driven more than average.  A car with low mileage is typically worth more than a car with high mileage.  The reason for this is that cars with low mileage are less likely to have mechanical problems.

What are trim levels for a car?

The trim level of your vehicle can play a role in trade-in value because it indicates what features are included. For example, a lower trim level may not have certain features like power windows and locks, while a higher trim level will have all the bells and whistles. When it comes to options, things like a sunroof or navigation system can add value to your car.

The base model is usually the cheapest because it has the least amount of features. As you move up in trim levels, the price of the vehicle will increase because there are more features included. The most expensive trim level is typically the luxury model or the performance model.

How do options affect the trade in value of a car?

Options can add both practicality and luxury to a vehicle, making it more desirable and, as a result, increasing its resale value. Luxury models will have features like heated seats, leather upholstery and a premium sound system. Performance models will have a more powerful engine and better handling. 

Options that come standard on a particular trim level will usually have less of an effect on resale value than options that are available as upgrades. This is because cars that come with certain options already included are more common, so there is less demand for them.

How does demand affect the trade in value of a car?

The demand for a certain model can play a role in its trade-in value. If there is high demand for a certain model, the trade-in value will be higher because dealerships know they can sell it quickly. On the other hand, if there is low demand for a certain model, the trade-in value will be lower because it will take the dealership longer to sell.

What is your car worth?

Trade in value can depend on a number of factors such as  condition, mileage, trim level, options and demand. Dealers rely on these factors as well as industry specific resources to establish what they're willing to give you for.

Is it time to trade in your vehicle?

We would love to give you a great offer for your old car. We are always looking for new inventory. Selling a car can be a hassle, so we take care of all the paperwork for you. You won’t have to worry about haggling with buyers or setting up appointments for test drives.

Contact us today to learn more about the process.

Compare Costs Buy New Car vs. Used

Buying used can save you thousands upfront and over cycles of ownership, but buying new has other advantages.

While buying new cars is enticing, you should take a cold, hard look at how much you could save over time by buying used cars instead.

The average person owns 13 cars in a lifetime, each costing an average of $30,000, according to a report by the National Automobile Dealers Association. If each of those cars was 3 years old, instead of new, you could save nearly $130,000 during your lifetime.

The real money-saver in buying a used car is wrapped up in a sinister-sounding financial word: depreciation.

Car buying’s dirty little secret

Once you fully understand how car depreciation sucks money out of your wallet, you’ll learn how to save boatloads of cash over your lifetime. You often hear that a car loses 20% of its value as soon as you buy it. Yes, in just one minute, a $30,000 car will lose $6,000 as you gleefully drive off. By the end of the first year, mileage and wear and tear could bring that to 30%, or $9,000. Why don’t you feel this big hit? Because it takes effect much later, when you sell or trade in your car.

Take a look at two similar cars, one new and one used.

New-car depreciation: You buy the car for $30,000 and sell it three years later for $15,000. The car has cost you $15,000 in depreciation.

used-car depreciation: Now let’s say you buy the same car, but it's 3 years old when you buy it. You could buy the car for $15,000. Three years later you could sell it for $10,000. So the used car depreciation cost you only $5,000.

Now, if you’re paying attention, you would quickly say, “But driving a brand new car is much better!” You’re absolutely right. So, if driving a new car is worth an extra $10,000 to you, go for it. But don’t say we didn’t warn you.

Forget the old used-car stigmas

It used to be common for people to put down used cars by saying that it was just a way to buy someone else’s problems. That’s not true anymore. Here are two updates on old knocks against used cars of recent vintage.

Reliability: Cars have never been more dependable than they are today. It’s not uncommon for some cars to deliver more than 100,000 miles before needing major repairs.

Maintenance: All cars require regular maintenance such as oil changes, tire rotation, brake jobs. But you can drive today’s cars much farther in between these scheduled maintenance visits. Even tires and brake pads last much longer than before.

More used-car advantages

So it’s pretty clear that buying a used car is much cheaper and that cars in general are more dependable. But take a look at these other advantages:

Lower car insurance rates: When a vehicle is worth less, it costs less to insure it when you're buying collision and comprehensive coverage. You can also drop collision and comprehensive coverage, which pay for repairs to your car, and save even more.

Registry renewals are cheaper: The cost of registering a used car goes down every year.

Move up to a luxury car: Because you can save 30% or more, you can shop in a higher class of cars.

Less stress: Got a ding in the door? Who cares? But when it’s the first dent in your new car, it’s a huge bummer.

New-car advantages

While nearly everything about used cars costs less, buying a new car has its advantages.

New-car shopping is easier: All new cars are assumed to be perfect, so evaluating the condition isn’t a factor. No need to take it to a mechanic. Also, it’s easier to figure out what you should pay for a new car, even if the negotiation process is still a pain.

More used-car options: Automakers offer plenty of incentives to lure buyers, such as cash rebates. New car loans have better interest rates. This means you'll likely pay thousands of dollars less than the frightening sticker price once you negotiate a final price and apply the incentives.

Advanced technology: New features for comfort, performance and safety are introduced in new cars every year. You’ll need to wait several years to get them in used cars.

Peace of mind: A new car will likely be more reliable than a used one, even though pre-owned cars are much more dependable than in the past. If a new car breaks down, you can have it fixed for free under the included factory warranty, at least for the first 36,000 miles or three years that most carmakers offer.

Prestige: Let’s put it this way: You don’t hear many people bragging about the used car they just bought.

An exception to the rule

Not all cars depreciate at the same rate. Some brands are known for holding their value exceptionally well. When you add in possible new-car incentives and low-interest used-car, there are times when buying a new car doesn’t cost much more than buying a 1- or 2-year-old car.

You can find how much cars depreciate on several automotive websites, such as Kelley Blue Book’s 5-Year Cost to Own or Consumer Reports’ Cost of Vehicle Ownership.

What it means for you

Depreciation is a silent killer to your automotive budget. But by buying cars that hold their value, you can minimize the effects. If you’re still on the fence, use a car loan calculator to see how much less your monthly payment would be if you bought used instead of new.

Article Originally published on Nerdwallet.comBy Philip Reed